The John Howes Lecture in Japanese Studies

The 2014 John Howes Lecture in Japanese Studies

Front Page Howes Lecture Final

With Guest Speaker Professor Laurel Rodd (University of Colorado)

Friday, December 5th, 2014
6:00 PM Reception
7:00 PM Lecture
Auditorium, Asian Centre, 1871 West Mall 

Laurel.jpegWhat does it mean to translate and how can it be done? And how can we as contemporary readers understand the writings of poets of the distant past from distant cultures?  In this talk, Professor Rodd will explore aspects of traditional Japanese poetry as exemplified in the Kokinshū and Shinkokinshū, and link them to approaches to the transmission of and translation of poetry.  She will offer examples of the “experiential learning” of later travelers—ranging from Bashō to her own students—as they sought  to understand poetry by returning to the scene of earlier compositions.

 

 Full Lecture:

Photo Gallery:

Poster:

2014 John Howes Lecture Poster

The 2013 John Howes Lecture in Japanese Studies

Howes lecture Front Page Slide

With Guest Speaker Professor Hardacre (Harvard University)

Thursday, November 21st, 2013
6:30 PM Reception
7:00 PM Lecture
Auditorium, Asian Centre, 1871 West Mall (map)
Free and open to the public – registration required

Full Lecture

helen hardacreIn this talk Professor Hardacre will address the debate in Japan today regarding religion’s contribution to the public good and how Shinto fits into it. This debate includes proposals to tax religious organizations, court cases regarding shrines and local government, and positions taken by the Association of Shinto Shrines on constitutional revision. Professor Hardacre will also examine Shinto in the popular imagination, works of contemporary literature, and popular culture.

 

 2014 Poster:

Howes Lecture Poster

 

The 2012 John Howes Lecture in Japanese Studies

Japan and the Culture of the Four Seasons: Nature, Literature, and the Arts

Haruo Shirane

Shinchō Professor of Japanese Literature and Culture at Columbia University

November 22, 2012

6:30pm Registration; 7:00 pm Lecture

Asian Centre Auditorium, 1871 West Mall

Elegant representations of nature and the four seasons populate a wide range of Japanese genres and media—from poetry and screen paintings to tea ceremony, flower arrangement, and annual observances. Dr. Haruo Shirane will show how, when, and why this practice developed and explicate the richly encoded social, religious, and literary meanings of this imagery.

On November 22, 2012, the Department of Asian Studies welcomed more than 140 alumni, professor emeriti, current students, faculty, and members of the community to the inaugural John Howes Lecture in Japanese Studies. The lecture series was proposed and funded by past students and colleagues of Dr. Howes, an intellectual historian of Japan who contributed to our Department through teaching, research, and development for more than three decades. This year’s speaker was Dr. Haruo Shirane, Shinchō Professor of Japanese Literature and Culture at Columbia University. He offered an in-depth perspective into the seasons as a changing motif woven into Japanese history and culture through his lecture, “Japan and the Culture of the Four Seasons: Nature, Literature, and the Arts.” A lively reception followed in the new foyer of the Asian Center. The Department is grateful to everyone who made this new lecture series possible.

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 Dr. John Howes

Guest Lecturer Dr. Haruo Shirane

Dr. Ross King with the Japanese Consul General

A toast to Dr. Howes

 

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