Asian Centre #212
6048225132
Professor and Associate Graduate Advisor, Asian Studies

Mailing address: Department of Asian Studies
607-1871 West Mall
Vancouver, BC
Canada, V6T 1Z2

Research Interests:

  1. The visual and narrative culture of wartime and Occupation era Japan (1930s-1950s), especially prose fiction, magazines for women and children, and kamishibai; the nature and function of propaganda; and the censorship of cultural products.
  1. Narratives of the posthuman in modern Japanese fiction, film, manga, and anime; science fiction; the queering of ontological boundaries.
  1. Postwar women’s fiction in Japan and its engagement with the body; gender, sex, and sexuality studies.
  1. Anomalous embodiment in popular culture products in the modern period in Europe, North America, and East Asia.

Education:

PhD in Far Eastern Languages and Literatures, University of Michigan, 1989

Selected Publications:

Monographs:

Propaganda Performed: Kamishibai in Japan’s Fifteen Year War. (Brill, 2014)

http://www.brill.com/products/book/performing-propaganda

http://www.amazon.com/Propaganda-Performed-Kamishibai-Fifteen-Year-Japanese/dp/900424882X/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1434670025&sr=8-2&keywords=sharalyn+orbaugh

Japanese Fiction of the Allied Occupation: Vision, Embodiment, Identity. (Brill, 2007)

Choice Outstanding Academic Title, July 2007

http://www.brill.com/japanese-fiction-allied-occupation

Style and Structure in the Short Works of Shiga Naoya. (PhD dissertation, UMI, 1989)

Edited volumes:

Sole editor, Columbia Companion to Modern Japanese Literature, new edition. Columbia University Press. Under contract, due for submission 2015.

Co-editor, with Joshua Mostow, Parody: Proceedings of the seventeenth meeting of the Association for Japanese Literary Studies. Volume 10. Summer, 2009.

Guest editor for special edition of the U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal, on manga (comic books for children and adults). Number 25, December, 2003.

Associate editor for Columbia Companion to Modern East Asian Literatures (sole editor for Japan materials). NY: Columbia University Press, 2003.

–Outstanding Academic Book for 2003, Choice magazine

–Runner-up for Best Single-volume Reference Work in the Humanities,          Association of American Publishers, Awards for Academic and Professional    Publishing Division

–Outstanding Publication, American Library Association’s University Press    Book Committee, 2003

Co-Editor, with Thomas Hare and Robert Borgen, The Distant Isle: Studies and Translations of Japanese Literature in Honor of Robert H. Brower. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Center for Japanese Studies, 1996.

Translations:

Oshikawa Shunro, Undersea Warship. Translation, Japanese to English, of proto-science fiction novel from 1900. Under contract with University of Minnesota Press; projected publication, 2017.

“In the Shadow of Mount Fuji” (Fuji no mieru mura de). Translation, Japanese to English, of a short story for a collection of works by zainichi-kankokujin (resident Koreans in Japan): Into the Light: An Anthology of Literature by Koreans in Japan, edited by Melissa Wender. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2010. Pp. 39-65.

Articles and Book Chapters:

Forthcoming: “Cult Film as Affective Technology in Oshii Mamoru’s Innocence.” Science Fiction Double Feature: The Science Fiction Film as Cult Text, edited by Jay Telotte and Gerald Duchovnay. University of Liverpool Press (2015).

Forthcoming: “Who Does the Feeling When There’s No Body There? Cyborgs and Companion Species in Oshii Mamoru’s Films.” Simultaneous Worlds: Global Science Fiction Cinema, edited by Sarah Wells and Jennifer Feeley. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press (2015).

Forthcoming: “Kamishibai: the Fantasy Space of the Urban Streetcorner.” 5000 word contribution to Japanese Popular Culture Reader, edited by Toby Slade and Alisa Freedman. Under contract with Routledge (2016).

Forthcoming: “Women’s Fiction in the Postwar Era.” 5000 word contribution to The Cambridge History of Japanese Literature, edited by Tomi Suzuki and Haruo Shirane. Cambridge University Press (2015).

“Robôs Vs. Ciborgues: A Corporificaçao de Gênero na Cultura Pop Japonesa” (Robots vs. Cyborgs: Gendered embodiment in Japanese Popular Culture), translated by Luisa Caminha Soares. In Ronan Alves Pereira and Tae Suzuki, eds. O Japao no Caleidoscopio: Estudos da Sociedade e da Historia Japonesa. Campinas: Pontes, 2014; 199-210.

“Suzuki Noriko and the Properly Feminine Nationalist Body in Kamishibai.” U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal 45 (2013); 50-68.

“Kamishibai and the Art of the Interval.” Mechademia 7. University of Minnesota Press, 2012; 78-100.

“How The Pendulum Swings: Kamishibai and Censorship under the Allied Occupation.” In Tomi Suzuki, Hirokazu Toeda, Hikari Hori and Kazushige Munakata, eds., Censorship, Media and Literary Culture in Japan: From Edo to Postwar. Tokyo: Shin’yôsha, 2012. Pp. 161-174.

“Furiko no yure: Rengôkokugun senryôka ni okeru kamishibai to ken’etsu” [Japanese translation of above.] In Suzuki Tomi, Toeda Hirokazu, Hori Hikari and Munakata Kazushige, eds., Ken’etsu, media, bungaku: Edo kara sengo made. Tokyo: Shin’yôsha, 2012. Pp. 154-165.

“Future City Tokyo: 1909 and 2009.” In Gary Westfahl, Wong Kin Yuen and Amy Kit-sze Chan, eds., Science Fiction and the Prediction of the Future: Essays on Foresight and Fallacy. Critical Explorations in Science Fiction and Fantasy, 27. Jefferson, NC and London: McFarland & Co., 2011. Pp. 84-103.

“In the Shadow of Mount Fuji” [“Fuji no mieru mura de”]. Translation (Japanese into English) of a short story for a collection of works by zainichi-kankokujin (resident Koreans in Japan): Into the Light: An Anthology of Literature by Koreans in Japan, edited by Melissa Wender. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2010. Pp. 39-65.

“Robot vs. Cyborg: Gendered Embodiment in Japanese Popular Culture.” In Estudos Japoneses—Crises, Desafios, Novos Paradigmas: Anais [Japanese Studies: Crisis, Challenges, New Paradigms: Proceedings]. Universidade de Brasilia, Prédio da Finatec, 2010. Pp. 103-109.

“Girls Reading Harry Potter, Girls Writing Desire: Amateur Manga and Shôjo Reading Practices.” In Tomoko Aoyama and Barbara Hartley, eds., Girls Reading Girls. Routledge; 2009. Pp. 174-186.

“Manga and Anime.” In Mark Bould, Andrew M. Butler, Adam Roberts, and Sherryl Vint, eds., The Routledge Companion to Science Fiction. Abingdon, UK and NewYork: Routledge, 2009. Pp. 112-122.

“Emotional Infectivity: The Japanese Cyborg and the Limits of the Human.” Mechademia 3. University of Minnesota Press, 2008; 150-172.

“Sex and the Single Cyborg.” In Christopher Bolton, Istvan Csicsery-Ronay, and Takayuki Tatsumi, eds., Robot Ghosts and Wired Dreams: Japanese Science Fiction from Origins to Anime. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2007. Pp. 172-192. [Reprinted from Science Fiction Studies.]

“Raced Bodies and the Public Sphere in Ichikawa Kon’s Tokyo Olympiad.” In James C. Baxter, ed., Historical Consciousness, Historiography, and Modern Japanese Values. Kyoto: International Research Center for Japanese Studies, 2007. Pp. 297-324.

“Frankenstein and the Cyborg Metropolis: The Evolution of Body and City in Science Fiction Narratives.” In Cinema Anime, ed. Steven Brown. New York: Palgrave, 2006; 81-111.

“Raced Bodies and the Public Sphere in Ichikawa Kon’s Tokyo Olympiad.” In Nihonjin no kachikan ishiki to hisutoriogurafii (The historiography of Japanese values and standards), ed. James C. Baxter. Kyoto: The International Center for Research on Japanese Culture, 2006. Pp. 355-375.

“The Genealogy of the Japanese Cyborg.” In World Weavers: Globalization, Science Fiction, and the Cybernetic Revolution, ed. Wong Kin Yuen, Gary Westfahl, and Amy Kit-sze Chan. Hong Kong University Press, 2005. Pp. 55-71.

“Creativity and Constraint in Amateur Manga Production.” In the U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal, number 25, December, 2003. Pp. 104-124.

Guest editor for special edition of the U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal, on manga (comic books for children and adults). Number 25, December, 2003.

Associate editor for Columbia Companion to Modern East Asian Literatures (sole editor for Japan materials). NY: Columbia University Press, 2003.

Contributed 12 essays (30,000 words) to the Columbia Companion to Modern East Asian Literatures. (NY: Columbia University Press, 2003): “Historical Overview”; “The Problem of the Modern Subject”; “Nation and Nationalism”; “Gender, Family and Sexualities in Modern Literature”; “Higuchi Ichiyo and Neo-Classical Modernism”; “Natsume Sôseki”; “Shiga Naoya and the Shirakaba Group”; “The Debate Over Pure Literature”; “Naturalism and the Emergence of the Shishôsetsu (Personal Novel)”; “Kawabata Yasunari”; “Occupation Period Fiction”; “Ôe Kenzaburô.”

“Busty Battlin’ Babes: the Evolution of the Shôjo in 1990s Visual Culture.” In Gender and Power in the Japanese Visual Field, ed. Norman Bryson, Maribeth Graybill, and Joshua Mostow. Honolulu: Hawai’i University Press, 2003. Pp. 200-228.

“Sex and the Single Cyborg: Japanese Pop Culture Experiments in Subjectivity.” Science FictionStudies, Volume 29, Number 3. (November, 2002). Pp. 436-452.

Contributed 13 entries to the Encyclopedia of Japanese Culture, ed. Sandra Buckley. (NY and London: Routledge, 2002): “Astroboy,” “Bishônen,” “Doraemon,” “Nintendo,” “Occupation Period Literature,” “Otaku,” “Power Rangers,” “Sailor Moon,” “Sanrio,” “Sazae-san,” “Shôjo,” “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles,” “Ultraman.”

“A Female Urashima Taro: Ohba Minako’s Return to Japan.” In Return to Japan from Pilgrimage to the West, ed. Yoichi Nagashima. Aarhus: Aarhus University Press, 2001. Pp. 300-319.

“Ohba Minako and the Paternity of Maternalism.” In The Father-Daughter Plot, ed. Rebecca Copeland and Esperanza Ramirez-Christensen. Honolulu: Hawai’i University Press, 2001. Pp. 265-291.

“Arguing with the Real: Kanai Mieko.” In Ôe and Beyond, ed. Philip Gabriel and Stephen Snyder. Honolulu: Hawai’i University Press, 1999. Pp. 245-277.

Co-Editor with Thomas Hare and Robert Borgen, The Distant Isle: Studies and Translations of Japanese Literature in Honor of Robert H. Brower. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Center for Japanese Studies, 1996.

“General Nogi’s Wife: Representations of Women in Narratives of Japanese Modernization.” In In Pursuit of Contemporary East Asian Culture, ed. Stephen Snyder and Xiaobing Tang. Boulder: Westview Press, 1996. Pp. 7-31.

“The Body in Contemporary Japanese Women’s Fiction.” In The Woman’s Hand: Gender and Theory in Japanese Women’s Writing, ed. Paul Schalow and Janet Walker. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996. Pp. 119-164.

“Extending the Parameters of Fiction: Style and Structure in Modern Japanese Literature.” In The Distant Isle, ed. Robert Borgen, Thomas Hare, and Sharalyn Orbaugh. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Center for Japanese Studies, 1996. Pp. 333-366.

Book Reviews

Review of Steven T. Brown, Tokyo Cyberpunk: Posthumanism in Japanese Visual Culture. For Science Fiction Film and Television 7.3 (2014); 449-52.

Review of Kirsten Cather, The Art of Censorship in Postwar Japan, and Jonathan Abel, Redacted: The Archives of Censorship in Transwar Japan. For the Journal of Japanese Studies 40.2 (2014); 435-443.

Review of In Godzilla’s Footsteps: Japanese Pop Culture Icons on the Global Stage, ed.  by William Tsutsui and Michiko Ito. For Science Fiction Film and Television. September, 2010; 320-323.

Review of Sabine Frühstück, Uneasy Warriors: Gender, Memory, and Popular Culture in the Japanese Army. For Monumenta Nipponica, Volume 64, Number 1 (2009); 226-229.

Review of The Columbia Anthology of Modern Japanese Literature, Vol. 1: From Restoration to Occupation, 1868-1945, edited by J. Thomas Rimer and Van C. Gessel. For Asian Studies Review (2006); 411-415.

Review of Amanda Seaman, Bodies of Evidence: Women, Society and Detective Fiction in 1990s Japan. For Monumenta Nipponica, Volume 59, Number 4 (2004).

Review of Isolde Standish, Myth and Masculinity in the Japanese Cinema: Towards a Political Reading of the Tragic Hero. For Monumenta Nipponica, Volume 57, Number 4 (2002).

Review of Joan E. Ericson, Be a Woman: Hayashi Fumiko and Modern Japanese Women’s Literature. For The Journal of Japanese Studies 25:1 (1999).

Review of Nanette Gottlieb, Kanji Politics: Language Policy And Japanese Script and J. Marshall Unger, Literacy And Script Reform in Occupation Japan: Reading Between the Lines, for The Journal of Japanese Studies (1997).

Review of Tomi Suzuki, Narrating the Self: Fictions of Japanese Modernity and John Treat, Writing Ground Zero: Japanese Literature and the Atomic Bomb. For Modern Fiction Studies, (1997).

Review of Susan Napier, The Fantastic in Modern Japanese Literature: The Subversion of Modernity. In The Journal of Asian Studies (1997).

Review of Ken K. Ito, Visions of Desire: Tanizaki’s Fictional Worlds. In The Journal of Oriental Studies, Hong Kong (1994).

Review of Oda Sakunosuke, Osaka Stories. In The Journal of the Association of Teachers of Japanese, Volume 26, Number 1 (1992).

Review of Japanese Women Writers. In Monumenta Nipponica, Volume 47, Number 2 (1992).

Selected Presentations (last fifteen years):

“I Take My Prison and I Make it My Playground: Manga/Manhwa and the Queering of Gender and Sex.” Invited presentation for workshop: Japanese & Korean Mediascapes: Youth, Popular Culture, and Nation. University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon. May 30, 2015.

“Japanese Pacification Propaganda in Occupied China: The Role of Kamishibai” Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. February 18, 2015.

“Kamishibai and Japan’s WWII Propaganda.” For the Visual and Material Culture Research Seminar series, Museum of Anthropology, UBC. January 15, 2015.

“Canada Customs vs. the Borderless World: Manga, Anime and Child Pornography.” Plenary presentation for Manga Futures, University of Wollongong, Australia. November 1, 2014.

“Big Japan, Little China: Melodrama, Family Metaphors, and the Ethnic Body in Japan’s World War Two Propaganda.” University of Wollongong, Australia. October 31, 2014.

“Jendaa paafômansu toshite no kokusaku kamishibai” (Propaganda kamishibai as gender performance). Daito Bunka University, Tokyo. October 26, 2014.

“The Media Characteristics of Propaganda Kamishibai.” European Association for Japanese Studies. University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. August 29, 2014.

“Mobilizing Japan’s ‘Young Citizens’: Propaganda Kamishibai Aimed at Children.” Invited symposium on Japanese Children’s Literature. Colorado College. Colorado Springs, CO. May 31, 2014.

Annual Meiji Jingu lecture, SOAS, University of London: “Mobilizing the Home Front: World War II Domestic Propaganda in Britain and Japan.” London, UK. October 2, 2013.

“Mobilizing Women: Kamishibai in Japan’s Fifteen Year War.” University of Manchester. Manchester, UK. September 30, 2013.

“The Co-Evolution of Animals and Cyborgs in Oshii Mamoru’s Innocence.” Haifa University. Haifa, Israel. May 30, 2013.

Keynote address for graduate student conference: “Selling Research on the Academic Marketplace: A Case Study Using World War II Propaganda in Japan.” University of Colorado, Boulder. March 8, 2013.

“Suzuki Noriko and the Properly Feminine National Body in Propaganda Kamishibai.” Pomona College. Los Angeles, California. November 30, 2012.

Inaugural lecture, East Asian speaker series: “Japanese Popular Culture Tackles the Big Questions: Gender, Race and Posthumanity.” University of Kentucky, Lexington. April 20, 2012.

Public introduction for film screening (Oshii Mamoru, Innocence) and Q & A afterward. Visions of the Future: Global SF Cinema conference, University of Iowa. April 13, 2012.

“Who Does the Feeling When There’s No Body There? Cyborg Affect in the Films of Oshii Mamoru.” University of Iowa. April 12, 2012. (Also presented at: Minnesota College of Art and Design, Minneapolis, October 1, 2011; University of Bologna, Italy, June 11, 2011; University of Zurich, Switzerland, October 22, 2009.)

“The Properly Feminine Wartime Body in the Propaganda Kamishibai of Suzuki Noriko.” Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference. Toronto, Canada. March 16, 2012.

“Killer Kitsch: Kamishibai in Japan’s Fifteen Year War, 1931-1945.” University of Alberta. Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. March 8, 2012. (Also presented at: Weatherhead Insitutute, Columbia University, New York City, October 18, 2010; University of Paris (INALCO), France, June 21, 2010; University of Vienna, Austria, June 1, 2010; Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic, May 6, 2010; Saint Anthony’s College, Oxford University, UK, January 28, 2010; World Art Forum seminar, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK, November 25, 2009; School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, UK, October 28, 2009.

“Trauma Narratives and the Boundaries of Contemporary Japanese Literature.” University of Venice, Ca’ Foscari. Venice, Italy. October 26, 2011.

Public interview with Japanese anime director Hara Keiichi. Sponsored by the Japan Foundation and the Vancouver Film Festival. Van City Theatre, Vancouver. September 18, 2011.

Two untitled pre-performance talks, Sankai Juku’s performance of Tobari. Vancouver Playhouse. November 5 and 6, 2010.

“Sankai Juku and the Rise of Butoh in Postwar Japan.” Lecture Series: Speaking of Dance. Sponsored by DanceHouse and Simon Fraser University (public lecture). SFU-Woodward’s, Vancouver. October 26, 2010.

Delivered keynote: “Robots vs. Cyborgs: The Gender of the Posthuman in Japanese Popular Culture.” The annual meeting of the Japanese Studies Association of Brazil. Universidade de Brasilia. August 26, 2010.

“Why are Japanese Cyborgs Always Female? Gender and the Posthuman in Japanese Popular Culture.” For Anime Evolution (fan conference), held in Vancouver, Canada. August 14, 2010.

“Selling the War to the People: Kamishibai (paper theater) as a Tool for Japanese Propaganda in World War II.” The Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Culture, Norwich, UK. April 15, 2010.

“Kamishibai and the role of the Shôjo in Japan’s Fifteen Year War.” For the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Culture. London, UK. March 10, 2010.

“Kamishibai as a Tool for Propaganda in Japan’s War with China, 1931-45.” Institute for Chinese Studies, Oxford University. February 25, 2010.

“Why are Japanese Cyborgs Always Female? Gender and the Posthuman in Japanese Animation.” Dickinson College. November 5, 2009.

“How the Pendulum Swings: Kamishibai and Censorship, 1938-1952.” Columbia University. March 7, 2009.

“Monstrous Utility: Ethics and Affect in Cyborg Anime.” University of British Columbia-Okanagan. October 6, 2008.

“Otaku Feminism: Cyborgs, Superflat, and Cute Culture in Japan.” College of the Okanagan. October 3, 2008.

“Kamishibai and the National/Social Imaginary in Modern Japan.” European Association for Japanese Studies Triennial Conference. University of Sorento, Italy. September 21, 2008.

“Otaku Feminism: Cyborgs, Superflat, and Cute Culture in Japan.” The Vancouver Art Gallery. July 28, 2008.

“A Female Orientalist and the Madame Butterfly Motif: Winnifred Eaton as Onoto Watanna.” Gender Studies Association of Ritsumeikan University. Kyoto, Japan. June 23, 2008.

“Monstrous Modernity: Hermaphrodites, Conjoined Twins, and Cyborgs in the Literature of Modernizing Japan.” University of Venice, Ca’ Foscari. June 4, 2008.

“Kamishibai as Propaganda in the Fifteen Year War.” University of Wisconsin. February 26, 2008.

“Cyborg Affect and the Limits of the Human.” University of Wisconsin. February 25, 2008.

“Kamishibai and the Construction of the National/Social Imaginary in Modernizing Japan.” Ca’ Foscari University of Venice.  May 21, 2007.

“Emotional Infectivity: The Japanese Cyborg and the Limits of the Human.” School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. May 1, 2007.

“Cyborg Feminism? The Postgender Body in Manga and Anime.” Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts. April 5, 2007. (Also presented at: Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. November 6, 2006.)

“Harry Potter and Japanese Fan Fiction Practices.” Carleton University, Northfield, Minnesota. February 21, 2007.

“Kamishibai and the Construction of Urban Space.” University of Toronto. November 16, 2006.

“Kamishibai as Entertainment and Propaganda.” The 2006 Jeremiah Lecture at the University of Oregon. October 16, 2006.

“Cyborg Sexuality and the Gender of the Posthuman.” University of Chicago anime society. February 25, 2006.

“Kamishibai and the Construction of the National/Social Imaginary.” University of Chicago. February 24, 2006.

“Kamishibai and the Construction of the Social/National Imaginary in Modern Japan.” Association for Japanese Literary Studies, Dartmouth College. October 8, 2005.

“Kamishibai as Entertainment and Propaganda.” The Asiatic Society of Japan. June 13, 2005.

“Female Suicide and the Gender Roles of Japanese Modernity.” University of Heidelberg, Germany. October 27, 2004.

“Higuchi Ichiyô’s Depiction of the Prostitute as a Working Woman.” Chiba National University. June 25, 2004.

“Frankenstein and the Cyborg Metropolis.” University of California, Irvine. June 10, 2004.

“General Nogi’s Wife: Historical Narrative and the Construction of Gender.” Deutsches Institut für Japanstudien, Tokyo, Japan. October 23, 2003.

“Colonialism’s Hybrid Identities: Kim Talsu and the Allied Occupation of Japan.” European Association for Japanese Studies biannual conference, Warsaw, Poland. August 30, 2003.

“Mad Dogs and Translators: Violence Across Languages.” University of Michigan. October 11, 2002.

“Kanai Mieko no tanpen shôsetsu ni okeru ‘shôjo fataaru’” [The ‘fille fatale’ in the short works of Kanai Mieko]. Ochanomizu University. Tokyo, Japan. July 14, 2002.

“Creativity and Constraint in Amateur Manga Production.” Association for Asian Studies Conference. Washington, D. C. April 6, 2002.

Keynote address: “The Construction of Gendered Discourse in the Modern Study of Japanese Literature.” For conference: “Across Time and Genre: Japanese Women Writing.” University of Alberta. Edmonton, Alberta. August 17, 2001.

“Kindai taishû bunka ni okeru saibôgu no keifu” [The genealogy of the cyborg in modern Japanese popular culture]. Ritsumeikan University. Kyoto, Japan. March 7, 2001.

“The Genealogy of the Cyborg in Modern Japanese Cultural History.” University of Michigan. Ann Arbor, Michigan. October 25, 2000.

“Japanese Women’s Writing and the Genealogy of the Cyborg.” University of Alberta, March 17, 2000.

“Sex and the Single Cyborg: Japanese Pop Culture Experiments in Subjectivity.” Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting. San Diego, California. March 11, 2000.

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